THE HUNTER AND THE WOODMAN

A hunter, not very bold, was searching for the tracks of a Lion. He asked a man felling oaks in the forest if he had seen any marks of his footsteps or knew where his lair was. “I will,” said the man, “at once show you the Lion himself.” The Hunter, turning very pale and chattering with his teeth from fear, replied, “No, thank you. I did not ask that; it is his track only I am in search of, not the Lion himself.”

Source | Aesop’s Fables,
Translated by George Fyler Townsend

CONSIDER THIS

The hero is brave in deeds as well as words.

In our dealings with God and with one another we are often like this hunter. We profess that we stand for something but when the full implication of what we profess stare us in the face we draw back.

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Author: philipchircop

I'm a Jesuit from Malta, an artist at heart and madly in love with all things beautiful and soulful: music, painting, sculpture, photography, film, theatre, poetry, good company, good food, good wine and more. I believe that beauty is a wonderful entry into the mystery of the God “whose centre is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere.” God can be sensed in all things if and when we engage in a long, loving look at the real that surrounds us. I consider myself a seeker with bottomless curiosity, an eternal student of life, exploring fresh and creative ways to proclaim the Good News in the hope of helping fellow pilgrims and seekers to embrace real and radical changes that will lead to conversion and transformation.

2 thoughts on “THE HUNTER AND THE WOODMAN”

  1. Thank you, Philip. Great story, and how true! One must be courageous enough and ready and willing to face the lion. I read recently that courage is a gift, not a skill, and it is a matter of the heart. Curtis Almquist says we can ask God for the gift of courage. Then we have to use it, of course, seize it and be attentive to where the tracks lead, watching for the hints and clues as a cat at a mouse hole – infinitely attentive and completely alert – being alive in the instant between past and future – the present. Funny coincidence, I was in a queue for coffee this morning as I began a shift in hospital and I sensed a presence behind me. I turned to see a very large man approaching, big chest and belly, and wearing a tawny-coloured tee-shirt – the entire front of which held the image of the full face of a mature male Lion.The effect was stunning, beautiful. I couldn’t help but remark “Now that’s a tee with a wordless statement!” We both had a good chuckle.

    -Br.

    Like

  2. Thank you, Philip. Great story, and how true! One must be courageous enough and ready and willing to face the lion. I read recently that courage is a gift, not a skill, and it is a matter of the heart. Curtis Almquist says we can ask God for the gift of courage. Then we have to use it, of course, seize it and be attentive to where the tracks lead, watching for the hints and clues as a cat at a mouse hole – infinitely attentive and completely alert – being alive in the instant between past and future – the present. Funny coincidence, I was in a queue for coffee this morning as I began a shift in hospital and I sensed a presence behind me. I turned to see a very large man approaching, big chest and belly, and wearing a tawny-coloured tee-shirt – the entire front of which held the image of the full face of a mature male Lion.The effect was stunning, beautiful. I couldn’t help but remark “Now that’s a tee with a wordless statement!” We both had a good chuckle.

    Like

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