THE DOG WHO WALKED ON WATER

A man took his new hunting dog on a trial hunt one day.  After a while he managed to shoot a duck and it fell in the lake.  The dog walked over the water, picked up the duck, and brought it to his master.

The man was stunned.  He didn’t know what to think.  He shot another duck and again, it fell into the lake and again the dog walked over the water and brought it back to his master.

Hardly daring to believe his eyes, and not wanting to be thought a total fool, he told no-one about it – but the next day he called his neighbour to come shooting with him.  As on the previous day he shot a duck and it fell into the lake.  The dog walked over the water and got it.

His neighbour didn’t say a word.  Several more ducks got shot that day – and each time the dog walked over the water to retrieve them – and each time the neighbour said nothing and neither did the owner of the dog.

Finally – unable to contain himself any longer the owner asked his neighbour – “do you notice anything strange about my dog?”

Yes – replied the neighbour – rubbing his chin and thinking a bit – come to think of it I do – your dog doesn’t know how to swim.”

Source: Robert Johnson, A Sermon A Day
Volume 2 (page 61)

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TWO GUYS HUNTING – Here’s a different version of the same story

These two guys used to go hunting with each other. One was positive and one was negative, every time.

The positive guy discovered something he didn’t feel the negative guy could complain about. He discovered a bird dog that could walk on water.

They were having a great day. They hit a duck. It landed in the water. The dog walked on water to pick up the duck and brought it back. The positive guy was smiling and the negative guy was frowning.

They hit a second duck. The dog walked on water out to the duck and brought it back. The positive guy was grinning like a gopher in soft dirt while the negative guy was cold and sour.

After they hit the third duck and the dog walked on water to retrieve it, the positive guy looked at the negative guy and said, “Haven’t you noticed anything about my new dog?” The negative guy said, “I have only noticed one thing. Your dog can’t swim!”

CONSIDER THIS

  • Point: Everything in life is the way you look at it.
  • Have you ever missed the point? The neighbour or the hunter with a negative outlook on life, missed the point completely. He couldn’t see the wonder of a dog that could walk on water; he could only see that the dog didn’t do what other hunting dogs do to retrieve ducks – that is to swim.
  • How do you react or respond when you experience something that  is outside your normal frame of reference?

 

 

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THROUGH MY DAUGHTER’S EYES

I felt inadequate growing up; chubby, never pretty enough, bent on perfection, feeling like I always needed to be better. As a result, I spent a long, long time looking in the mirror, never seeing someone I liked.

Then one day all of that changed when I met for the first time a beautiful, passionate, and confident woman – myself …

It was a hot summer day and my daughter Jessica wanted to go swimming. I had a horrible headache and was feeling sorry for myself, having not yet lost the weight from my last pregnancy, eight months before.  I was on mommy overload  and had no energy left to go outside and play. I couldn’t see any light at the end of the tunnel.

After an hour of Jessica begging me to at least try on my bathing suit, I agreed to take her swimming.  She sat on my bed, watching me try on two or three old bathing suits.

“That one’s beautiful,” she said, so sincerely.

“Oh no, this one is still a little too tight,” I replied, turning to look at the back of my thighs and then back to my paunchy stomach hanging over the seam. I was horrified.

“I like that one the best!” Jessie said, nodding her head for added enthusiasm.

“Yeah, I guess it looks okay,” I said halfheartedly.

“But how does it feeeeel, Mommy?” she asked.

I smiled at her attempts.

“Well, it feels pretty good. Let’s go swim.”

We ran out the back door and Jessica immediately jumped into the pool, begging me to jump in after her. But I like to go in the slow way, so I began inching my way in, toe first, then my ankle.

“Jump in Mommy!” Jessica squealed.

I was so hot, and knowing that I would have to start dinner soon, I figured, what the heck, and cannonballed into the water. Jessie was delighted that I hadn’t followed my normal routine, and she swam over to me splashing and kicking.  She gave me a big hug.

“How do you feel?” she squealed again.

“Cold,” I stammered, laughing and trying to catch my breath.

Jessica giggled and splashed around me some more, then threw her little arms around my neck.

“How do you feel now?” she asked.

“I feel great” I said with the enthusiasm I knew she was waiting to hear in my voice.

“See Mommy?” she said, smoothing my hair away from my face. “You do look beautiful.”

I climbed out of the pool and cannonballed in all over again. But this time, I left the old me standing behind on the deck – the me I never wanted Jessica to know. I felt young and happy again, cutting loose in the water with a new freedom …

I caught a glimpse of the way Jessica saw me, and I understood how awful she’d feel if she knew how bad I felt about myself.

Source | Marlo Thomas, Bruce Kluger, The Right Words at the Right Time Volume 2: Your Turn,
(Atria, 2007) pages 114-117

CONSIDER THIS

It is said that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”  Beauty is not inherent in anything – it’s how we look at things.

Beauty isn’t always something that you see; it’s also something that you do and that you feel –  laughing out loud,  dancing with gusto,  holding hands with someone you love,  reaching your goals,  running through the sprinklers, taking chances,  loving completely,  singing along with the car radio,   sharing your life with someone, knowing your kids think you’re funny, and cannonballing into a pool.

These things are beautiful.  They make you feel beautiful. Beautiful is not an adjective, but a verb.

PREPARING FOR TEMPTATION

One day a father said to his son, “Now, son, don’t swim in that canal.”
“OK, Dad,” he answered. But he came home carrying a wet bathing suit that evening.
“Where have you been?” demanded the father.
“Swimming in the canal,” answered the boy.
“Didn’t I tell you not to swim there?” asked the father.
“Yes, Sir,” answered the boy.
“Why did you?” he asked.
“Well, Dad,” he explained, “I had my bathing suit with me and I couldn’t resist the temptation.”
“Why did you take your bathing suit with you?” he questioned.
“So I’d be prepared to swim, in case I was tempted,” he replied.

Source | Unknown

PONDER AND CONSIDER

Some people fall into temptation, but a great many make plans for disaster ahead of time.