Once upon a time a psychology professor walked around on a stage while teaching stress management principles to an auditorium filled with students. As she raised a glass of water, everyone expected they’d be asked the typical “glass half empty or glass half full” question. Instead, with a smile on her face, the professor asked, “How heavy is this glass of water I’m holding?”

Students shouted out answers ranging from eight ounces to a couple pounds.

She replied, “From my perspective, the absolute weight of this glass doesn’t matter. It all depends on how long I hold it. If I hold it for a minute or two, it’s fairly light. If I hold it for an hour straight, its weight might make my arm ache a little. If I hold it for a day straight, my arm will likely cramp up and feel completely numb and paralyzed, forcing me to drop the glass to the floor. In each case, the weight of the glass doesn’t change, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it feels to me.”

As the class shook their heads in agreement, she continued, “Your stresses and worries in life are very much like this glass of water. Think about them for a while and nothing happens. Think about them a bit longer and you begin to ache a little. Think about them all day long, and you will feel completely numb and paralyzed — incapable of doing anything else until you drop them.”

Source: Short Stories Of Inspiration & Motivation
Chris Blenning (2018) pages 12-13

CONSIDER THIS

It’s important to remember to let go of your stresses and worries. No matter what happens during the day, as early in the evening as you can, put all your burdens down. Don’t carry them through the night and into the next day with you. If you still feel the weight of yesterday’s stress, it’s a strong sign that it’s time to put the glass down.

“Worry never robs tomorrow of its sorrow, it only saps today of its joy.” –Leo F. Buscaglia

“People get so in the habit of worry that if you save them from drowning and put them on a bank to dry in the sun with hot chocolate and muffins they wonder whether they are catching a cold.” –John Jay Chapman

Photo by Nicolas Ruiz

THE CLOCK THAT HAD A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN

the-clock-that-had-a-nervous-breakdown

The new clock was ticking away on the shelf two ticks to the second as any good, self-respecting clock should tick when it began to think about how many times it was going to have to tick. “Two ticks to the second means 120 ticks per minute,” it mused. “That’s 7200 ticks per hour, 172,800 ticks per day, 1,209,600 per week for 52 weeks, and a total of 62,899,200 per year.” Horrors! Straightway the clock had a nervous breakdown.

The clock was taken to a psychiatrist who patched up the mainspring as well as he could then asked, “Clock, what’s your trouble?” “Oh, doctor,” wailed the clock, “I have to tick so much. I have to tick two ticks a second and 120 ticks per minute and 7200 ticks per hour, and.” “Hold it,” the psychiatrist cut in, “How many ticks do you have to tick at a time?” “Oh, I just have to tick one tick at a time,” was the reply. “Then let me make a suggestion,” replied the doctor. “You go home and try ticking one tick at a time. Don’t even think about the next tick until it’s time. Just tick one tick at a time. That you can do.”

Source: The original source is unknown to me

CONSIDER THIS

How often do we get bogged down thinking about all we have to do? Today, let me suggest this to you: Tick one tick at time, even if what you’re ticking is things off of your to-do list!

Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today.  – Matthew 6:34 (NRSV)

Give your entire attention to what God (Life) is doing right now, and don’t get worked up about what may or may not happen tomorrow. God (Life) will help you deal with whatever hard things come up when the time comes. – Matthew 6:34 (The Message)

WITHNESS

A little boy was late getting home one day. When he finally showed up, his worried mother asked, “Where have you been?”

The little boy explained, “I stopped to help a friend whose bicycle had broken down.”

“But you don’t know how to fix a bicycle,” his mother said.

“That’s true,” replied the little boy, “But I stopped to be with him while he cried.”

Source | Unknown

PONDER AND CONSIDER

A simple story about real presence which is nothing more and nothing less than a radical, attentive, continued and generous form of listening.

%d bloggers like this: